What’s New in the Technology & Innovation Department: E-Rate

With temperatures in the 50s this past weekend, it finally seems as though spring is in sight.  While day-to-day technology support needs in the district tend to hit a bit of a lull at this time of year – many chronic issues have been solved, and most new technology initiatives and programs are well-established – this is a busy time of year from a planning perspective. Read More »

ICCSD Internet Service Disruption

On Monday, February 20th at 6:30 PM, ICCSD will experience an internet service outage due to scheduled maintenance by our internet service provider, the Iowa Communications Network (ICN).  During the outage, internet service will not be available within district buildings, and some district-provided web services, such as Exchange email, will not be available.  The district website, PowerSchool, and Google services will continue to be available during this time. 

While we do not yet have an expectation from the ICN regarding how long this maintenance window will take, we are estimating a four-hour service disruption. 

Classroom Suite Selected

After reviewing bids, the recommendation of the ICCSD Technology & Innovation department is that the district’s new classroom technology suite include:  Read More »

Security Error

An update to the Chrome browser caused an alert to appear when people are trying to use district webmail, along with several other district sites, in Chrome. The updated Chrome browser flags all secured (HTTPS) websites that don’t have a certificate that Google considers to be valid as unsecured.

The site will still work if you click advanced and then proceed, and is in fact encrypted and secure.  We’re working on updating our security certificate with a new registrar that will remove this error in Chrome.

If you continue to have trouble opening webmail or other district sites in Chrome, please switch to Firefox or Edge, or use Microsoft Outlook to access your email.

Elementary Device Weighted Resource Allocation Model

One of the areas of research that I’ve followed closely has been the digital divide, generally defined as an disparity in the amount of access that students have to technology at school and at home (Dolan, 2016) but sometimes expanded to include in-school versus out-of-school literacies (Nasah, DaCosta, Kinsell, & Seok, 2010) or inequity driven by race and gender (Vie, 2008).  As we’ve transitioned to a digital society over the past 40 years, technology literacy is no longer an option.  Even in early elementary grades, mandatory assessments are increasingly delivered online, while students applying for college and financial aid will find that applications, supporting documents, work portfolios, and scholarship opportunities are almost entirely digital.   Read More »