Tag Archives: digital divide

Elementary Device Weighted Resource Allocation Model

One of the areas of research that I’ve followed closely has been the digital divide, generally defined as an disparity in the amount of access that students have to technology at school and at home (Dolan, 2016) but sometimes expanded to include in-school versus out-of-school literacies (Nasah, DaCosta, Kinsell, & Seok, 2010) or inequity driven by race and gender (Vie, 2008).  As we’ve transitioned to a digital society over the past 40 years, technology literacy is no longer an option.  Even in early elementary grades, mandatory assessments are increasingly delivered online, while students applying for college and financial aid will find that applications, supporting documents, work portfolios, and scholarship opportunities are almost entirely digital.   Continue reading Elementary Device Weighted Resource Allocation Model

Technology Access and Initiative Success

Several people – over Thanksgiving break, and again this morning – have posed questions to me about whether a focus on getting more technology in the classroom is well-justified.  After all, tying technology infusion in the classroom directly to student achievement, for instance, is very difficult (although the same is true of virtually any initiative, the effects of which are difficult or impossible to fully entangle from other factors impacting students, teachers, and the learning environment.   Continue reading Technology Access and Initiative Success